The Christensen Institute

Why personalized learning is hard to study

The Christensen Institute

This week saw the release of the third in a series of personalized learning studies conducted by the RAND Foundation. The research analyzed implementation, survey, and efficacy data in a sample of schools that are part of the Next Generation Learning Challenges (NGLC) portfolio, and compared that data to a national sample of schools. The findings? NGLC schools yielded some positive academic results, but educators and administrators reported numerous challenges.

Ecuador and the case for market-creating innovations in oil exporting countries

The Christensen Institute

On April 11th, 2021, Ecuadorians elected a new president, Guillermo Lasso, with a 71% approval rating. When the former banker took office in May, he promised to grow the struggling economy and create jobs.

Insiders

Sign Up for our Newsletter

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Service apply.

3 development lessons from America’s longest war

The Christensen Institute

Once US troops began pulling out of Afghanistan, it quickly became clear that the Afghan government couldn’t stand on its own. In fairly short order President Ashraf Ghani fled the country and Taliban took control of the government.

Data 293

How South Korea became the “most innovative country” in the world

The Christensen Institute

60 years ago, South Korea was likely one of the last places associated with a thriving private sector. With a majority of people living in poverty, its GDP per capita was lower than that of Haiti, Ethiopia, or Yemen, making South Korea one of the poorest countries in the world.

To improve individual lives, a top-down approach won’t work (Part 1)

The Christensen Institute

In the health care industry, we have settled on the term ‘social determinants of health’ to refer to the societal, population-level structures that influence health outcomes.

Yes, the global middle class is growing, but the real growth opportunity is already here

The Christensen Institute

Even with the economic setbacks brought about by the pandemic, the global middle class has grown rapidly in recent years. Between 2011 and 2019, the number of people living on $10 to $50 a day grew by 54 million per year on average. .

Why we are piloting the What Investors Want series

The Christensen Institute

Our Global Prosperity research at the Christensen Institute is guided by two simple questions: What is the causal mechanism behind prosperity? And how can we engender it globally?

Disruptive tech does not need to be high tech

The Christensen Institute

A patient goes to their doctor and is told they have high blood pressure. The physician recommends the patient begins to monitor their own blood pressure at home and lists a number of possible at-home monitors to use.

New survey suggests teachers’ roles post-lockdown are unsustainable. Should expectations of schooling change?

The Christensen Institute

Schools are back in-person, but that doesn’t mean things are back to normal, according to our latest survey of 684 teachers.

Survey 192

Healthcare has an accessibility problem—disruptive innovations can help

The Christensen Institute

The healthcare system in the United States is expensive and riddled with logistical and systemic barriers, all of which add up to a lack of accessibility. A 2020 study found that almost 25% of Americans skipped out on medical care because of the cost.

Demystifying metrics: 3 strategic steps to measuring students’ relationships

The Christensen Institute

In a continuation of a pattern that started prior to the pandemic, surveys from this past spring reported high levels of anxiety and depression among high schoolers.

Survey 156

How two-way communication makes school-family relationships stronger

The Christensen Institute

Many lessons were learned during the past year of remote learning, but one remains particularly relevant as classrooms around the country reopen: Schools and families can’t effectively support students without being in partnership with each other.

The supreme importance of innovation theories

The Christensen Institute

In a recent podcast with Future Africa, Michael Seibel, CEO and partner at Y Combinator (YC), noted that, “80% of the companies that do YC raise money on demo day. Only] 2% build successful companies.”

Exit emerging economies, enter growth economies; a long overdue name change

The Christensen Institute

Names are important. They help us identify, describe, and categorize. What comes to your mind when you hear the names Apple, Netflix, or Disney ? They are all household names, synonymous with both innovation and pleasant customer experiences.

Creating a market for people who need jobs

The Christensen Institute

What is the value of schooling in a country where many who are educated are unemployed and struggle to make a living? That is the question that troubled Valmir Pereira, the CEO of Mind Lab.

Course 156

Momentum behind learning pods drives $1.5M fundraising round for startup KaiPod

The Christensen Institute

The rise of pandemic learning pods is showing signs that it may have staying power. That momentum is fueling investor interest in learning pod solutions, including KaiPod Learning, which has raised $1.5

Teacher shortages and burnout? Here’s how schools can help, rather than hinder, their most valuable asset.

The Christensen Institute

K–12 schools and districts across the country are experiencing teacher shortages and receiving reports of teacher burnout in record numbers. According to recent RAND Corp.

5 tips to promote equity in the classroom through a focus on students’ relationships

The Christensen Institute

For as long as schools have existed, educators have been well-aware of the importance of supporting the whole child. This means that students’ access to caring, trusting relationships— who they know —is as imperative for their learning and wellbeing as what they know.

Not all charity is created equal: 3 questions charitable organizations need to ask themselves

The Christensen Institute

Despite the financial setbacks faced by many in 2020, charitable giving rose to an all-time high. Global giving statistics aren’t collected, but in the United States people donated a record $471 billion dollars to charitable organizations, the equivalent of 2.25% of the county’s GDP for that year.

System 302

This school year, it will take a village

The Christensen Institute

George’s* initial months of COVID schooling followed an all too familiar path: once a strong student, as a seventh-grader flung into a virtual classroom last March, George started to fall behind in reading and history.

Three reasons anti-poverty programs don’t work, and how there’s a better way

The Christensen Institute

Now that the COVID-19 pandemic seems to be directly affecting more people in growth economies , it’s clear that more people will be pushed into poverty.

Designing schools for flexibility when students need it now more than ever

The Christensen Institute

Even for the best educators, meeting every student’s needs can prove elusive. Most schools operate a rigid system of teacher-led, whole-class instruction that moves at a single pace and is designed for order and efficiency, not adaptability.

For high schools, let’s preserve variant of hybrid learning after COVID

The Christensen Institute

As school communities ponder what new COVID-induced practices they should maintain post-pandemic , high on the list should be a variant of hybrid learning for high schoolers.

Course 273

Success is hiding in your customers’ untold stories

The Christensen Institute

Imagine that it’s 10:40 a.m. on a Wednesday morning, and you’re sitting at your desk. You have 20 minutes before a string of meetings lasts from 11a.m. – 5 p.m., and you’ve been battling what is likely a sinus infection for ten days.

Continuing blended learning in the fall? Keep these 9 steps in mind for success.

The Christensen Institute

Blended learning—the integration of online learning into brick-and-mortar school settings—has gained traction, if also notoriety, during the pandemic. Traction because the hybrid arrangements that many schools turned to this year largely rely on blended learning.

The power and simplicity of Job to Be Done theory

The Christensen Institute

The most important tool in an innovator’s toolbox: Jobs Theory.

How gaps in social capital research are holding us back, and what to do about it

The Christensen Institute

Anna Arsenault, research project manager for education, co-authored this piece. As COVID wears on, “relationships matter” can feel like a tired cliche.

Data 210

Can telehealth disrupt traditional models of healthcare? It depends.

The Christensen Institute

With COVID opening the door to the recent rise in telehealth, we’ve spent some time talking about its pros and cons, what is needed to help sustain its growth , and our own predictions for its longevity. .

Marrying freedom and funding: How districts can become education’s new inventors

The Christensen Institute

For many school systems, the time, money, and effort spent to improve K–12 education seems to offer a lackluster return on investment.

How a better understanding of corruption could have helped in Afghanistan

The Christensen Institute

Corruption was always inevitable in Afghanistan. Not because the country is special, but because corruption is inevitable wherever there are people. In places where many people are poor and embroiled in conflict, like Afghanistan, corruption is even more pervasive.

Employers have a simple tool in the war for talent: Stop requiring degrees

The Christensen Institute

As companies enter a fierce war for talent , they have one simple tactic at their disposal that could help unlock vast pools of potential talent: eliminate the degree requirement for open jobs.

Tools 262

Is it the government’s job to build infrastructure? It depends.

The Christensen Institute

In March, the Biden administration announced a behemoth infrastructure package. The more than $2 trillion plan is designed to create jobs, boost America’s productivity by building or upgrading the nation’s infrastructure, and position the United States as a leader in clean energy.

2020 vs. 2021: Notable trends in innovative school practice nationwide

The Christensen Institute

Recently I told a group of high school students that my research investigates how schools are changing during the pandemic. One student’s unprompted reaction in the Zoom chat was so straightforward that it made me chuckle: “Oh we changed a lot.” Indeed.

Trends 325

The real opportunity of a lifetime: Invest federal funds in families to help students of color thrive

The Christensen Institute

This past summer, Miguel Cardona, Secretary of Education, urged Congress to make available $103 billion in discretionary funds as a “down payment” toward improving the funding disparity for high-poverty schools. The request came on the heels of a June 2021 report published by the U.S.

Mental and physical health’s necessary balancing act

The Christensen Institute

At the recent Tokyo Summer Olympics, fan favorite and 2016 all-around gymnastics champion Simone Biles raised eyebrows by stepping back from much of the competition to prioritize her mental health.

System 240

Edtech that connects can boost whole child supports

The Christensen Institute

This summer, schools are being bombarded with edtech solutions promising accelerated learning or better online environments than Zoom sessions of the year past.

EdTech 246

Assessments don’t always translate outside the classroom, but students’ networks do

The Christensen Institute

Before COVID, an “ epidemic of untapped potential ” was emerging. Year after year, many of Boston’s best and brightest were successfully completing high school only to face obstacles that thwarted their ability to reach their potential.

The flaw behind today’s outcomes-based data in higher education

The Christensen Institute

In the years leading up to his death, my mentor Clay Christensen battled many ailments. He wondered often about when things were all said and done, as a deeply religious, man, how would he be viewed when he had his final interview with God?

Teachers’ pandemic experiences reveal the shortcomings of compliance culture

The Christensen Institute

“Hardest year since my first year. I feel like I failed my students this year.” This year has been very hard on all teachers, we work too much and get paid very little.” This has been the hardest year ever and I hope to return to some type of normalcy again soon.”.

Survey 248

A post-mortem on online internships: Lots of hype or signs of hope?

The Christensen Institute

The past year thrust one of the most-celebrated (yet understudied) onramps to the world of work online: internships. What did this experiment in online and hybrid internships teach us? Who thrived and who floundered?

Data 249

Problems, solutions, and outcomes; a big misunderstanding in development

The Christensen Institute

The first time I visited a village in Nigeria where people didn’t have access to water, I instantly wanted to solve the problem. The solution seemed simple enough: build a water well. So, with the help of friends and family I raised $10,000 and built a well in the village. It worked—for a bit.

Why-and How-large corporations should invest in market-creating innovations

The Christensen Institute

This piece was co-authored by Christimara Garcia, a volunteer at the Christensen Institute and founder of Catalyze Innovations Initiative, a Brazilian market-creating innovation action tank.

Social determinants of health finally gained recognition thanks to COVID and America’s racial reckoning

The Christensen Institute

It’s becoming increasingly obvious that health status is not just about medical care. Nationwide health initiatives, such as Healthy People 2030, have recognized and incorporated social needs as an integral part of health status.